The Paleo Mom https://www.thepaleomom.com The Paleo Mom is a scientist turned health educator and advocate. Sat, 24 Jun 2017 16:54:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 TPV Podcast Episode 253, Coconut Oil Controversy https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-podcast-coconut-oil/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-podcast-coconut-oil/#respond Sat, 24 Jun 2017 14:11:18 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=112056 In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about recent news items that say that coconut oil is as “bad” as animal fats. Plus! The Paleo View Live is coming to the DC area! Click here to listen in iTunes or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below If you enjoy the show, please review …
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In this episode, Stacy and Sarah talk about recent news items that say that coconut oil is as “bad” as animal fats. Plus! The Paleo View Live is coming to the DC area!

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below


If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 253: Coconut Oil Controversy

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
  • CONTROVERSY IN PALEO!? Coconut oil isn’t heart healthy?!
    • A news story has swept through the paleo community saying that perhaps coconut oil isn’t healthy to eat.
    • See news stories like here. This is based on a report from the American Heart Association, which is always changing its ideas on fats.
    • First off, this study says nothing about topical use, and we put it on everything!
    • Coconut oil is a unique plant fat because it is 60% saturated fat, but different from animal saturated fats in that it is a medium chain triglycerides. For example, lauric acid, which is only a little longer than the health healthy fatty acids.
    • Saturated fats are the easiest to use for energy. Medium chain only need one step to produce energy as well.
    • See Sarah’s post on saturated fat: It can be healthy, but you can overdo it!
    • Hunter-gatherers tended to have 13% of calories as saturated fat, which is a normal omnivorous diet without going out of your way to eat fat.
    • Study compared oleic fatty acid fats versus coconut oil and found that some people had an increase in LDL, HDL and total cholesterol. But only some!
    • This is due to a gene that makes some people more susceptible to fat causing cholesterol and LDL increase. This is called APOE4.
    • These people should stick to a 20-30% fat intake for heart health. We still need fat for cell health, brain health, gut health, etc!
    • Of course some studies of coconut oil find no change in heart health with coconut oil.
    • The end result of these studies don’t offset all the benefits of coconut oil. It’s anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, cell health, immune health, gut health etc.
    • And remember: eating vegetables and seafood, Vitamin D, sleep, exercise and stress reduction are all better ways to improve heart health!
    • And 60% of calories from fat is the threshold where we see cardiovascular health problems.
  • Rate and Review us! Goodbye!
  • Outro (46:02)

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Understanding Lyme Disease: A Primer https://www.thepaleomom.com/understanding-lyme-disease-primer/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/understanding-lyme-disease-primer/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:00:06 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=111091 With 2017 predicted to be one of the riskiest years ever for Lyme-carrying ticks (thanks to an explosion in the mouse population last year that was thanks to a bumper crop of acorns the year before), understanding what Lyme disease is and what it looks like has never been more important.  In fact,  Lyme disease …
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With 2017 predicted to be one of the riskiest years ever for Lyme-carrying ticks (thanks to an explosion in the mouse population last year that was thanks to a bumper crop of acorns the year before), understanding what Lyme disease is and what it looks like has never been more important.  In fact,  Lyme disease is severely underdiagnosed and can be an underlying challenge for many people with autoimmune disease.  If you struggle with any chronic symptoms or autoimmune disease, I highly encourage you to check out The Chronic Lyme Disease Summit 2, for which I am very excited to be one of the featured speakers.  This summit is an amazingly comprehensive resource on chronic Lyme!

 

Take me to The Chronic Lyme Disease Summit 2

What Is Lyme Disease?

Chronic Lyme disease is a serious condition that the CDC reports as being the fastest growing vector-borne infectious disease (transmitted by another organism, like an insect) in the United States. Recent reports suggest that as many as 300,000 people are infected with Lyme disease every year; we are really dealing with a serious health epidemic here!

Lyme is caused by infection with the spirochete (a spiral-shaped bacteria) Borrellia burgdorferi, which has 5 subspecies and over 300 strains worldwide. This spirochete is carried by ticks and passed on to humans when an infected tick bites us. The majority of cases in the United States have been reported along the East Coast, though there have been some cases in most states. As of 2015, 95% of reported cases were isolated to 14 states in the Midwest and along the East Coast.

Ticks are small arthropods that belong to a special group of mites. Their bites break the skin, which permits the passage of infectious disease by carrier ticks (note that the percentage of ticks that are actually carrying Lyme varies between 1% and 100% depending on the region). Ticks are most likely to be found in tall grassy and woodland areas, especially during the summer months.  They can be as small as a poppyseed, so many people contract Lyme disease without even being aware that they were bitten by a tick.

There’s not much that can be done to prevent contracting Lyme disease other than practicing anti-tick measures (especially in high-risk areas where the percentage of ticks carrying Lyme is particularly high), including wearing long pants in the woods and performing thorough self-checks. (There are currently no vaccines for Lyme; the most recent one, Lymerix, was taken off the market in 2002. There is one being tested but it’s several years away from being available.)  For more information, the CDC has some useful tips on Preventing Tick Bites.

While the vast majority of tick bites will not result in the transmission of disease (I don’t want to scare anyone here!), it’s important to note the warning signs of an acute Lyme infection.

Signs and Symptoms of Lyme

The symptoms that occur soon after being bitten by a Lyme-infected tick are called acute Lyme disease.  In some people however, symptoms can persist for months of even years after initial antibiotic treatment for Borrelia burgdorferi. And sometimes, the symptoms resolves initially but reoccur months or years later. This is typically referred to as chronic Lyme disease; however, the CDC doesn’t recognize anything beyond the initial infection (the acute phase). Much like adrenal fatigue, there are many known cases of chronic Lyme disease (and scientific studies looking at mechanisms, especially of chronic Lyme arthritis), yet functional medicine practitioners are much more likely to be trained to identify and treat chronic Lyme. 

Acute Lyme Infection

There are some hallmark signs of an acute Lyme infection that merit a trip to the doctor’s office. Early signs and symptoms, occurring 3 to 20 days after a tick bite, include the following:

  • Fever & chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle and joint aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • “Erythema migrans” rash at the site of the tick bite

The last sign, erythema migrans, is a bullseye-like rash that starts at the site of the tick bite. The CDC states that 70-80% of reported cases feature this rash within 30 days of the bite, but there is conflicting evidence in the greater Lyme community (in fact, according to the International Lyme and Associated Disease Society, only 50% of people with chronic Lyme even recall a tick bite!).

If the above symptoms aren’t addressed, more severe signs and symptoms may develop. These can include:

  • Severe headaches with neck stiffness
  • Additional erythema migrans rashes on other areas of the body
  • Arthritis with severe joint pain and swelling, especially in the knees
  • Facial palsy (partial paralysis of the face)
  • Intermittent pain in tendons, muscles, joints, and bones
  • Heart palpitations or irregular heart beat
  • Episodes of dizziness or shortness of breath
  • Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord
  • Nerve pain
  • Shooting pains, numbness, or tingling
  • Short term memory problems

These issues are no joke. If you suspect that any of the above symptoms match what you’re currently experiencing, please go to the emergency room immediately!!

Yet, it is even more complicated than this. Why? Because when Lyme disease goes untreated – and sometimes even when it is treated – people can develop a long-term, chronic form of the disease that can range from annoying to debilitating.

Chronic Lyme (AKA “Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome”)

Chronic Lyme Disease is the result of untreated or improperly treated Lyme. According to the CDC, the lingering symptoms that the alternative community have deemed chronic Lyme can be categorized “post-treatment Lyme Disease syndrome,” though there is little guidance from them about how to treat it.

Some studies report that as many as 60% of people with untreated acute Lyme disease develop chronic symptoms, most typically including joint swelling and pain (especially the knees) months or years later.  And, at least 10% of those who are treated for acute Lyme will still develop chronic symptoms.  Chronic Lyme disease isn’t just about joint swelling and pain however; there are many symptoms that can point to chronic Lyme disease, including:

  • Fatigue
  • Sleep issues
  • Joint pain
  • Muscle aches
  • Depression
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Heart problems

There is no one course of disease when it comes to chronic Lyme. For some people, the acute Lyme symptoms persist or worsen through conventional treatment (most commonly, a very intense, weeks-long course of antibiotics); for others, the symptoms may stay dormant for a while and then resume months or years later. How is this possible? The organism that causes Lyme, Borrellia burgdorferi, is an unusual kind of bacterium that is able to evade the immune system. The theory is that Lyme spirochetes may continue to live in the host’s (infected person’s) organs, including the liver, brain, gut, and other parts of the body, and the immune system continually attacks the spirochetes. In fact, it is the immune system activation that can cause many of the symptoms associated with chronic Lyme (especially fatigue, joint pain, and brain fog).

Lyme Disease and Autoimmunity

The first indication that chronic Lyme disease might be an autoimmune disease came from a study that showed that patients with chronic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis had a gene (HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR4) that also increases risk of rheumatoid arthritis.  Other autoimmune diseases, including sarcoidosis, schizophrenia (suspected to be an autoimmune disease), and dementia (also suspected to be an autoimmune disease) have also been associated with Borrelia infections. There is evidence that Borrellia burgdorferi triggers autoimmune disease in genetically-susceptible individuals through molecular mimicry, meaning an antibody that our immune systems produce against Borrellia burgdorferi also recognizes tissues within our own bodies (antibodies against LFA-1 and CK10 have been identified as cross-reactive antibodies to Borrellia burgdorferi epitopes). And while there’s still more unknown than known, there’s ample evidence that Th1 lymphocytes are key drivers of the inflammatory response in chronic Lyme disease, another hallmark of autoimmune disease.

Chronic Lyme disease as an autoimmune disease may explain why some people with untreated acute Lyme disease suffer persistent symptoms, whereas others do not. And, it may explain why some people suffer persistent symptoms even after antibiotic treatment.  If you have been diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease, it’s important to read up on the Autoimmune Protocol.  While antibiotic and/or antimicrobial treatment is still indicated to eradicate the underlying infection, additional intervention (like the immune-regulating diet and lifestyle guidelines of the Autoimmune Protocol) to deal with immune activation and autoimmunity may also be required.

Testing for Lyme Disease

For the most part, conventional doctors rely on the clinical signs and symptoms with a history of tick bite(s) to diagnose acute Lyme disease. However, there are some additional tests available. Because Lyme is known to evade the immune system, antibody tests against Lyme spirochetes may not be reliable in all people. There are some tests designed to detect the presence of whole bacteria: polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antigen detection, and culture testing. These tests are not FDA approved but may be helpful when it comes to determining the extent of Lyme infection.

Oftentimes, people with chronic Lyme disease are treated for other conditions or told by conventional physicians that they are not sick. If you suspect that you have chronic Lyme disease, working with an alternative healthcare practitioner such as a functional medicine doctor is the best option.

Diagnosis & Next Steps

Diagnosis will involve working with a practitioner, ideally someone in the alternative medical community who is familiar with the nuances of chronic Lyme disease, to combine your clinical picture with  lab tests. Treatment for Lyme disease often involves a combination of conventional and alternative therapies (e.g., antibiotics and herbal medicine) and can take months to years to resolve, so having a community around us while going through treatment is essential.

The symptoms of chronic Lyme are often mistaken for fibromyalgia, depression, and chronic fatigue syndrome. When it comes to chronic Lyme, patients are often their own advocates – just one of the many reasons that resources like the Chronic Lyme Disease Summit 2 are so important.

 

 

 

Check out The Chronic Lyme Disease Summit 2 HERE

Citations

Bockenstedt LK, Radolf JD. Xenodiagnosis for posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome: Resolving the conundrum or adding to it? Clin Infect Dis. first published online February 11, 2014 doi:10.1093/cid/cit942.

Barbour A. Remains of infection. J Clin Invest. 2012 Jul 2;122(7):2344–6. doi: 10.1172/JCI63975. Epub 2012 Jun 25.

Bockenstedt LK, Gonzalez DG, Haberman AM, Belperron AA. Spirochete antigens persist near cartilage after murine Lyme borreliosis therapy. J Clin Invest. 2012 Jul 2;122(7):2652–60. doi: 10.1172/JCI58813. Epub 2012 Jun 25.

Embers ME, Barthold SW, Borda JT, Bowers L, Doyle L, et al. (2012) Persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Rhesus macaques following antibiotic treatment of disseminated infection. PLoS ONE 7(1): e29914.

Feder, et al. A critical appraisal of “chronic Lyme disease”. New Eng. J. Med. 2008; 357:1422–30.Steere AC, Gross D, Meyer AL, Huber BT. Autoimmune mechanisms in antibiotic treatment-resistant lyme arthritis.J Autoimmun. 2001 May;16(3):263-8.

Kalish, RA, Leong, JM, and Steere, AC. Association of treatment-resistant chronic Lyme arthritis with HLA-DR4 and antibody reactivity to OspA and OspB of Borrelia burgdorferi. Infect Immun. 1993; 61: 2774–2779

Singh SK, Girschick HJ. Lyme borreliosis: from infection to autoimmunity. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2004 Jul;10(7):598-614.

Marques, A. Chronic Lyme disease: a review. Infect Dis Clin North Am 2008; 22:341–60.

Marques, A. et al. Xenodiagnosis to detect Borrelia burgdorferi infection: A first-in-human study. Clin Infect Dis. first published online February 11, 2014 doi:10.1093/cid/cit939.

Ghosh S, Seward R, Costello CE, Stollar BD, Huber BT. Autoantibodies from synovial lesions in chronic, antibiotic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis bind cytokeratin-10. J Immunol. 2006 Aug 15;177(4):2486-94.

Steere AC, Falk B, Drouin EE, Baxter-Lowe LA, Hammer J, Nepom GT. Binding of outer surface protein A and human lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 peptides to HLA-DR molecules associated with antibiotic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Feb;48(2):534-40.

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The BEST Home Workout Programs! https://www.thepaleomom.com/best-home-workout-programs/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/best-home-workout-programs/#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 12:00:29 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=109649 The importance of exercise is ingrained into many of our minds, and for good reason: physical activity routinely shows up as health-protective in studies, and we’ve identified a wide range of mechanisms explaining why that’s the case. Getting regular moderate exercise decreases risks of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. In fact, …
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The importance of exercise is ingrained into many of our minds, and for good reason: physical activity routinely shows up as health-protective in studies, and we’ve identified a wide range of mechanisms explaining why that’s the case. Getting regular moderate exercise decreases risks of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. In fact, the World Health Organization has identified the lack of physical activity as the fourth leading risk factor for mortality, being responsible for an estimated 3.2 million deaths each year globally! With such strong science supporting its role in our lives, physical activity is a clear tenet of the Paleo framework.

The Benefits of Exercise

Some of the benefits of exercise are obvious. Increasing muscle mass causes an increase in metabolism, making it easier to maintain a healthy weight. Most people like the way they look better when they have bigger and more defined muscles. And it’s just plain handy to be stronger, faster, more flexible, and more agile. But there are some additional benefits that we might not immediately think of as we contemplate adding more or different types of activity to our lives. Regular exercise improves our insulin sensitivity, modulates our cortisol levels, stabilizes our moods through the release of endorphins and can even help normalize our circadian rhythms (see Why is Exercise So Important)!

Exercise also reduces inflammation by reducing levels of proinflammatory cytokines (chemical messengers of inflammation) in fat tissue and inhibiting important inflammatory mediators (specifically Toll-like receptor and IL-1 signaling).  This makes living an active lifestyle key for mitigating chronic disease. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of activity are evident immediately after even gentle exercise (one study showed a significant increase in secretory IgA and defensin immediately following a 90-minute yoga practice) and also build over time (another study showed that secretory IgA continues to increase over 3 years with walking for 45 minutes five times per week). In fact, we can reap the big rewards simply from moving more throughout the day and avoid prolonged periods of inactivity (see The Benefits of Gentle Movement).  Even a 2-minute movement break every 20 minutes of otherwise sedentary (i.e., sitting) time can completely negate the health detriments of inactivity.

How Much Should I Exercise?

Studies show major health benefits with at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week (it doesn’t matter if this is spread out throughout the week or all at once one day of the weekend).  But, the more active you are, the greater the health benefits (provided you are giving your body sufficient recovery time between strenuous or exhaustive workouts, see Why Exercising Too Much Hurts Your Gut). For even greater health benefits, aim for 300 minutes (5 hours) of moderate-intensity activity or 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of vigorous activity each week. You can absolutely mix it up with some moderate activity and some vigorous activity (use the Rate of Perceived Exertion Chart to identify whether your intensity level is moderate or vigorous). As a general rule, 1 minute of vigorous activity is about equivalent (in terms of health benefits) to 2 minutes of moderate activity.  And, it’s important to include at least 2 days per week of muscle-strengthening activity targeting all of the major muscle groups  (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms) within the week.

Working Out at Home

With this kind of weekly time commitment for optimal health benefits, a great way to set ourselves up for success is to build a workout program right in our own home. I find home workouts are amazing for many people because they eliminate a major barrier: time! Cutting down travel time to the gym, park or recreation center gives us back more minutes for exercise. By setting up a home gym or investing in some simple pieces of equipment, we often give ourselves even more open time slots to work out, such as when our kids are napping. Heck, I’ve even been known to squeeze in a few squats while I’m waiting for something to boil on the stovetop!  The other advantage to home workouts?  Over the long run, they tend to save tons and tons of money!

The programs below are completely amazing for building a home workout routine, and they run the gamut from kettlebells and quick metabolic conditioning to more gentle bodyweight movements. They all include scaleable modifications for beginners and moves challenging enough for advanced fitness fanatics.

Strong From Home

Developed by Noelle Tarr of Coconuts and Kettlebells,  Strong From Home is a complete home workout library will give you everything you need to develop a killer strength routine at home! It arrives as a downloadable PDF with photo demonstrations of every exercise, detailed routines, and recommendations on inexpensive equipment needed for some of the workouts. What I like most about Noelle’s approach is that it’s, well, approachable—there’s no fancy jargon and very little frilly equipment. Instead, you’ll get high-quality instruction, real-life advice, and an intense workout.

 

Autoimmune Strong

Autoimmune Strong is a favorite of mine because it’s so thoughtfully created for those of use with autoimmune disease. It comes from the mind of Andrea, another Certified Personal Trainer and Nutritional Therapy Practitioner who suffered herself with fibromyalgia, chronic pain, and chronic fatigue. After becoming frustrated with the cycle of exercising and experiencing negative symptoms, she designed a program with these conditions in mind. The result is a blend of exercise, community support and diet and lifestyle recommendations that are truly unique. The routines are 10-30 minutes long, so they really fit into a busy schedule well. I love this program for anyone at any level of a healing journey. Movement is so important in any form, and with Autoimmune Strong you can feel confident your specific needs are being taken into account.

 

Kettlebell Movement

Want to create a safe and truly challenging workout with as little equipment as possible? Kettlebells are your answer! They’re incredibly versatile and inexpensive compared to other equipment. But they can also be tricky to use. Proper kettlebell movement isn’t something you can easily pick up from YouTube. This is where my friend Peter’s course, Kettlebell Movement, comes in! Peter Hirsh is a nationally certified personal trainer whose complete library of videos and tutorials can take your kettlebell training to the next level. You’ll learn the proper and most effective way to use kettlebells at home. Start with a free trial to see what Peter’s Kettlebell Gym is all about!

 

Lift Weights Faster

I’ve had a total girl crush on Jen Sinkler for years, and lately I’m loving all the high-quality fitness programs she’s developed with other women (like Bedrock Strength and The Bigness Project!). But the original program in her lineup, and the one I want to point out to you is Lift Weights Faster. It’s a series of simple but effective exercise circuits that are super short and use minimal equipment. Don’t be fooled, though—these workouts are tough! You can choose from varying lengths and equipment to keep things fresh. And don’t worry, they’re totally scaleable.

 

Primal Play

Darryl Edwards’ Primal Play classes are the one session I ALWAYS make time for at Paleo f(x) because they are challenging but also so. much. fun! Darryl’s take on fitness focuses on engaging our primal instincts for play with fun, physically challenging games we can take anywhere—no equipment needed! This is such a beautifully different take on “working out,” and one I believe really aligns with our natural styles of movement. This is the program I recommend for anyone who’s bored with their fitness routines or just looking for fresh ways to bring movement back into their life!

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TPV Podcast Episode 252, How Do I Lose Weight With My Restrictions Without Going Low Carb? https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-podcast-weight-loss-low-carb/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/paleo-podcast-weight-loss-low-carb/#respond Fri, 16 Jun 2017 15:35:25 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=110844 In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss losing weight without going low carbs and tips for how to get to healthy when you’re overweight. Click here to listen in iTunes or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes! The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 252: …
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In this episode, Stacy and Sarah discuss losing weight without going low carbs and tips for how to get to healthy when you’re overweight.

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below


If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 252: How Do I Lose Weight With My Restrictions Without Going Low Carb?

  • Intro (0:00)
  • News and Views (0:40)
    • Do you have summer adjustment issues? Sarah does!
    • Sarah is trying to finish her books and give her kids attention.
    • Meanwhile, Stacy is managing her time with adding working out back into her schedule.
    • Stacy had a run in with a notorious troll. She was told she has to lose weight before she works out to minimize injury.
    • That’s complete nonsense! Sarah agrees! Stacy turned it into an opportunity to talk about communication. We call this kind of person a “self-help troll”.
    • Sarah had a similar experience when she went on antibiotics for pneumonia recently, despite us saying that there’s definitely a time and a place for medicine!
    • But people who are concern trolling are “D words”
    • Sarah has been doing a series on healthy weight loss on her blog. Check it out!
    • Sarah does a lot of research on this! She knows what she’s talking about! But so many people tangentially related to paleo are selling you bad advice with extreme recommendations and bad science. This stuff can destroy hormones, endocrine systems, and metabolism!
    • Remember: Movement is essentially for health at any size! So much of science agrees!
    • Anyone with an internet connection can post something, so figure out why people are saying what they are saying!
    • You can love and respect yourself AND desire to lose weight!
  • Question from Jen: “Since I know you and Sarah have both lost weight, I wanted to ask for some suggestions. I lost weight going Paleo a few years ago, around 55 pounds. I have more than 100 to lose but those 55 were amazing. Problem was I also losing my hair. I added back potatoes, rice & more carbs and the hair loss stopped but the weight loss stopped too. (I’ve since read about low carb and thyroid issues – I have Hashis). But even adding carbs, I gained nothing back – just stayed the same. Went through a major life stressor a couple years ago and gained it all back plus some. I want to attempt to get it off again but I’m at a loss as to what to do. I’ve read Sarah lost most of her weight low carb but I’m so afraid to do that again. I’m not trying to get skinny, but I want to feel more functional again. It’s super hard to follow most weight loss blogs since I already can’t eat gluten or oats or much dairy or too many raw veggies or nightshades… lol! Any direction or advice you may have would be super appreciated.”
    • Low carb does not have a metabolic advantage: it just tricks you into eating less!
    • Actually that’s the same as paleo. On average, people are eating about 400 calories less per day
    • While it’s not as simple as calories in/calories out, calories do matter for weight loss!
    • Weight loss can have negative effects while you’re doing it. Often there is nutrient deficiencies (which can stop your fat burning!)
    • Exercise burns calories and increases metabolic rate! Very good
    • Sleep loss will cause you to overeat and messes with hormones
    • Stress will also cause you to hold on to weight.
    • Taken all these factors together and you are left with a paleo template!
    • Healthy weight loss is slow!
    • Hyper palatable foods are a problem: They override your satiety sensations and make you want more!
    • Sarah recommends eating veggies to compensate!
    • Denise Minger reminded us that eating fat and refined carbohydrates leads to weight gain.
    • Stacy has mindsets that she has from low carb weight loss that she is trying to break. Like drinking bulletproof coffee in the morning.
    • Sort through your food habits to see what you can fix for weight loss.
    • Use an app to track your eating habits as a food journal to see where your extra calories are coming from! Try Chronometer or MyFitnessPal.
    • Snacking tends to be the biggest issue, especially with lack of sleep.
    • Are you getting enough fiber and proteins? Are you getting enough nutrients? What’s going on?
    • If you can, get a body composition measurement to see what’s going on. Get your basal metabolic rate to see where your calorie requirements are.
    • Also, don’t sit down to a plate of only carbs. Pair them with other foods or right before bed.
    • Starchy vegetables can probably be your only source of carbs plus some fruit
    • See Sarah’s posts on weight loss here.
    • Being thin is not the same thing as being healthy. And losing weight is not the same as getting healthy.
    • Losing excess weight is a side effect of getting healthy. Being overweight is only a symptom.
  • Rate and Review us! Goodbye!
  • Outro (53:37)
  • Bloopers: Near and Far was a Grover sketch on Sesame Street.

 

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