The Paleo Mom https://www.thepaleomom.com The Paleo Mom is a scientist turned health educator and advocate. Sat, 22 Jul 2017 15:30:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 TPV Podcast, Episode 257: Live Show Part 3 https://www.thepaleomom.com/live-show-part-3/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/live-show-part-3/#respond Fri, 21 Jul 2017 13:25:35 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=115358 In this episode, we bring you the third installment of our live show! We take even more live questions and go in-depth with our answers! Click here to listen in iTunes or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes! The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 256: Live …
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In this episode, we bring you the third installment of our live show! We take even more live questions and go in-depth with our answers!

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 256: Live Show Part 3

  • Intro (0:00)
  • Welcome to the live show, this is Part 3 of our show! Listen to Part 2 of the live show here and Part 1 of the live show here!
  • Question 1: Christine asks, how do you find out which vitamin and mineral defficiencies are associated with your autoimmune disease?
    • Sarah: Some studies have shown deficiencies, others have just shown improvements with supplementation, but not very many of these studies group autoimmune diseases and study deficiency differences across all of them
    • Right now, there are incomplete data showing which is most important
    • “Frequent flyers” are Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Zinc and Omega-3 Fats.
      • You can also look at what the immune system uses, Vitamin A and D and Zinc are key for regulatory actions
      • The immune system’s proteins need methylation, so B6, B9, B12 are key for that as are Vitamin C and E as antioxidants
      • Iron, Copper, Magnesium (maybe more minerals)
      • All these have key role in the immune system, so it’s unsurprising that these deficiencies are linked with diseases
  • Question 2: If my children (an older daughter and a baby son) never try gluten and dairy, how will I know if they have an intolerance or Celiac Disease?
    • Stacy: we decided to just assume that our kids have it, given our family history, and to not test
    • If it’s important for you to test Celiac, you’ll have to expose your kids
    • Sarah: chances are very good that your daughter (who was never exposed) will rebel and eat some gluten eventually, and it’s ok to wait for that challenge
    • Stacy: reminder that some people can have issues with gluten and no physical symptoms. Stacy and Cole just get emotional and depressed when they’re reacting
    • They can’t tell you to fix anything if you DO get a positive result—you just have to avoid it anyway.
    • Sarah: research shows there’s a lower risk of Celiac if gluten is introduced while breastfeeding, and the longer you breastfeed the lower the risk, so introducing to a baby is more backed by research
    • In the same situation, Sarah would probably include a little wheat a couple of times toward the end of breastfeeding (around 2 years) so they can communicate whether something is wrong
    • In peanut allergy studies, babies were fed a very small amount to help reduce allergies, so it doesn’t have to be a huge serving
  • Question 3: Jessica’s son did the cheek swab DNA test, with her second child she’s just said “we have Celiac.” Is the DNA test helpful?
    • Sarah: studies of people with Celiac susceptibility genes, HLADQ2 and HLADQ8, have shown that people without Celiac who also have digestive symptoms still have a zonulin response to gluten. They’re still getting a leaky gut in response to gluten, even though it’s not Celiac
    • 60% of the population has one or both of these genes, which explains non-Celiac gluten sensitivity
    • Having one of those risk genes is a compelling argument not to mess with Gluten, because of the risk of a leaky gut reaction
  • Question 4: The Dr. from the Gluten Free Society’s website claims there are two other genes associated with Gluten sensitivity, HLADQ1 and HLADQ3, which no standard Celiac test looks for. Any other research on this?
    • Sarah hasn’t seen anything on that, but she’s never specifically looked through the research for that
    • 3% of Celiacs don’t have HLADQ2 or HLADQ8, that 3% could have that other selection of genes
    • Already more than a dozen HLA variants linked with autoimmune diseases
  • Question 5: Can Sarah share her Paleo road trip snacks?
    • She didn’t try to eat on the road, she packed picnic lunches
    • Stacy
      • Her family has done grocery store rotisserie chickens or chicken strips from Trader Joe’s, because they’re easy to pull apart and share
    • Sarah
      • On the way back, they’ll probably try to find a burger place
      • Hard to find grass-fed, but places that clean the grill, lettuce wrap or do gluten free buns would be ideal
      • Overall, she has a cooler in the back and a snack bag between the kids
      • It’s the same snacks they use at home, but she always makes sure to include protein, like EPIC Strips
      • She always includes raw veggies, fruit and something sweet, like Power Balls
      • When everybody’s miserable having a treat is really helpful for mood
      • Sarah’s oldest loves Cliff Kit’s Organic Bars and her youngest loves raisins
    • Stacy
  • Question: Do either Sarah or Stacy use a water filter, and which one?
    • Matt:
      • tap water is one of the greatest inventions of mankind.
      • The fact that we have potable water delivered to our house for cheap, any time we want, is great.
      • It goes through so much processing to get to potability in our houses that he really feels like honoring tap water by drinking it
    • Sarah
      • She agrees, but a lot of the members of her family have chloramine sensitivity (her brother missed a year of school due to this sensitivity) so Sarah has always used at least a Brita filter
      • Her municipal water is Dasani so that’s basically what they’re drinking if they use a charcoal filter
      • Sarah recently won a reverse-osmosis filter, but she feels like she has to add back in so many minerals to make it a helpful source of minerals
      • Sarah thinks we should remineralize our tap water – she uses Trace Minerals and EM Drops
      • Mostly adding Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium and some trace minerals. Most people (yes even Paleo peeps) are mineral deficient
      • She’s adding probably up to 20% of her family’s RDA to their water
      • Reminder: Sarah comes from socialist Canada and sort of automatically trusts the government, but recognizes that doesn’t necessarily reflect the American experience
      • Pay attention to stuff, there’s plenty of contaminated water out there, so you might want to make sure your municipal water is safe
      • BUT she thinks tap water is fine
    • Matt
      • When he was growing up in Mass., well water is pretty hit-or-miss, so his dentist prescribed fluoride to everyone
      • He and his brother (who did not have well water) had stained teeth from too much fluoride
      • So, it’s just a matter of knowing what’s in your water
    • Sarah
      • There’s not a lot of evidence that fluoride is causing health problems, but also little evidence it’s helping dental health
      • Fluoridated toothpaste, on the other hand, has some really compelling science backing its efficacy
      • There’s some science to show that fluoride might sequester in the pineal gland and over 60, 70, 80 years decrease the amount of melatonin secreted by that gland, linked with sleep disturbances in the elderly, but that’s sort of a big leap at this point
      • But you can take that out with a normal carbon filter if you are concerned
  • Rate and Review us! Goodbye!
  • Outro (33:00)

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Why Vegetable Oils are Bad https://www.thepaleomom.com/vegetable-oils-bad/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/vegetable-oils-bad/#comments Thu, 20 Jul 2017 12:00:40 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=114471 In recent years, the belief that all fat is bad (a relic of the Food Pyramid and nutrition advice from decades ago!) has all but died. Now, the concept of “healthy fats” has taken hold, and low-fat diets are no longer seen as optimal even in mainstream nutrition. Woot! Well, that’s the good news: the …
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In recent years, the belief that all fat is bad (a relic of the Food Pyramid and nutrition advice from decades ago!) has all but died. Now, the concept of “healthy fats” has taken hold, and low-fat diets are no longer seen as optimal even in mainstream nutrition. Woot! Well, that’s the good news: the bad news is that there’s still a great deal of confusion about what healthy fats (and unhealthy fats) really are! In fact, even recent science news articles have expounded on vegetable oils as being the best choice, citing research on olive oil.  They. Are. NOT. The. Same. Thing.

When we look closely at the evidence, it’s easy to parse which oils and fats are healthy, and processed vegetable oils are firmly on the “bad for us” list, while natural fats (including from animals!) not only make our food tastier, but can actually benefit our health. That’s why avoiding processed oils (and embracing healthy sources of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and omega-3s) is a major tenet of Paleo eating.

But, plenty of high-profile institutions (like the American Heart Association, the USDA, and even Harvard Medical School) are still promoting processed vegetable oils as good for us, especially when it comes to cardiovascular health—largely because of their tendency to lower LDL cholesterol. Why the conflicting advice? Let’s clear up the confusion by seeing what processed oils do in our bodies, and why they really don’t deserve a place at the table!

What Are Processed Vegetable Oils?

Processed vegetable oils are unsaturated oils extracted from seeds (including grains and legumes). Think: soybean oil, corn oil, sunflower seed oil, cottonseed oil, and canola oil, just to name a few. By definition, vegetable oils require extensive processing because the types of plants these oils come from don’t give up their fat very easily (imagine trying to extract fat from corn kernels!). That processing can include the use of mechanical extraction, high heat, industrial chemicals, deodorization, and toxic solvents. And, because this type of mechanical and chemical extraction didn’t exist until fairly recently, vegetable oils are relative newcomers to our diet.

Some plant-based oils are totally fine (like extra virgin olive oil [see Olive Oil Redemption: Yes, It’s a Great Cooking Oil!], avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, and coconut oil) because they can be cold-pressed, require far less processing, retain more micronutrients and antioxidants, and have a more beneficial fatty acid profile. On the flip side, processed vegetable oils are harmful for a few major reasons.

Omega-6 Content

The predominant fat in processed vegetable oils is omega-6, mostly in the form of linoleic acid. Although small amounts of essential omega-6 fats are necessarily for us to stay alive, most people eat way more than we require, especially relative to our omega-3 intake (omega-6 and omega-3 compete for the same rate-limiting enzymes, so balancing them is important). Ideally, the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fats should be close to 1:1, but the ratio in Western diets is closer to 16:1! And, we owe a lot of that to a high intake of vegetable oils (along with grains and grain-fed animal products). In fact, between the years 1909 and 1999, the US consumption of soybean oil alone increased 1000-fold! That led to a huge spike in the percent of our daily calories that come specifically from omega-6 fats.

The problem? Omega-6 fats contribute mainly to pro-inflammatory pathways, and when eaten in excess (or not balanced out with enough omega-3), they can stir up tons of trouble. Studies have linked high intakes of omega-6 (and a high ratio of omega-6 to omega-3) with a wide range of health problems, including certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory diseases, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease, metabolic dysfunction, and obesity. And, trials involving a reduction in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio have been shown to improve survival after the development of heart disease, reduce the proliferation of rectal cells in people with colorectal cancer, reduce asthma symptoms, and suppress inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Bottom line, introduction of processed vegetable oils into our diet has pushed our omega-6 intake to unprecedented levels, and may be at the root of many modern chronic diseases.

Oxidation

One of the problems with highly unsaturated oils is their susceptibility to oxidation. Because polyunsaturated fats (like omega-6 fatty acids) contain multiple double bonds (compared to monounsaturated fats, which have only one double bond, and saturated fats, which have none), they’re prone to reacting with oxygen. This can happen before the oil ever enters our body (such as while cooking, or if the oil is improperly stored and becomes rancid), but it can also happen in our bodies when the fats we consume from vegetable oils get incorporated into our tissues. While consuming already-oxidized oils is bad, oxidation of fats inside our body is also highly problematic. One of the ways a high omega-6 intake may contribute to cancer is by increasing the proportion of omega-6 in our cell membranes, leading to lipid peroxidation and ultimately DNA damage. By contrast, saturated and monounsaturated fats are much less prone to oxidation as a result of their chemical structure!

Healthy Alternatives

Given what we know, there’s truly no reason to include processed vegetable oils in our diet (but plenty of reasons not to!). And that doesn’t just mean the bottled oils we have in the pantry: processed oils can sneak their way into products like mayonnaise, salad dressing, and any packaged food. Checking labels goes a long way!

So, what should we use in place of processed vegetable oils? Depending on the dish and cooking method, olive oil, macadamia nut oil, flax oil, coconut oil, palm oil, grass-fed butter (for those of us who tolerate it), lard, tallow, duck fat, and other animal fats can all be great Paleo-friendly alternatives. And of course, many whole foods (like olives, coconut, avocados, nuts, seeds, fatty fish, fish roe, eggs, grass-fed meat, and high-quality dairy for those who tolerate it) can supply an even wider range of micronutrients while also providing plenty of beneficial fat; check out my post, “Which Fats Should You Eat?” for more details!

Citations

Blasbalg TL, et al. “Changes in consumption of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the United States during the 20th century.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 May;93(5):950-62.

Longo AB & Ward WE. “PUFAs, Bone Mineral Density, and Fragility Fracture: Findings from Human Studies.” Adv Nutr. 2016 Mar 15;7(2):299-312.

Muhlhausler BS & Ailhaud GP. “Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the early origins of obesity.” Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2013 Feb;20(1):56-61.

Nair J, et al. “High dietary omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids drastically increase the formation of etheno-DNA base adducts in white blood cells of female subjects.” Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Aug;6(8):597-601.

Simopouls AP. “Evolutionary aspects of diet, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio and genetic variation: nutritional implications for chronic diseases.” Biomed Pharmacother. 2006 Nov;60(9):502-7.

Simopoulos AP. “The importance of the omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases.” Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2008 Jun;233(6):674-88.

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Review: Do Yourself a Favor and Get Real Plans https://www.thepaleomom.com/review-real-plans/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/review-real-plans/#comments Mon, 17 Jul 2017 13:38:19 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=113458 Meal Planning has, for me, always been like that pile of stinky garbage lingering in the corner of my kitchen. Should I take it out? Yes. Will I take it out? Probably not until I’m laying in bed listening to the garbage trucks pick up my neighbors’ trash. I’ve meal planned (and remembered my garbage, …
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Meal Planning has, for me, always been like that pile of stinky garbage lingering in the corner of my kitchen.

Should I take it out? Yes.

Will I take it out? Probably not until I’m laying in bed listening to the garbage trucks pick up my neighbors’ trash.

I’ve meal planned (and remembered my garbage, fwiw) in the past. I know that it saves me time, money and sanity and helps me stay healthy by meeting nutritional goals. Like that stinky pile of garbage, things are just better when I get ahead of it.

Real Plans’ idiot-proof meal planning service finally made my meal plan on a consistent basis, a feat I attribute to its super-simple online interface, excellent customer service, and amazing iPhone App. It was so easy that things got harder when I didn’t use it.

Real Plans gifted me a one-month subscription so I could take it for a spin. In this post, I’ll take you through how my boyfriend and I planned a month of meals with Real Plans and which features we loved best.

Starting Out

Real PlansReal Plans assumes you need some serious meal planning help—not a bad thing, considering the hectic pace at which most of us function. After an initial questionnaire, Real Plans takes your preferences into account and populates a schedule with the number of meals you requested each week.

This is handy if you’re new to Paleo, have fewer weekly routines or are just out of inspiration. The recipes are fantastic, and run the gamut from basics (nice if you have something new from a CSA, for instance) to dinner-party-fancy. Plus, there’s something there for every dietary preference. Real Plans is not just Paleo, and I think that’s a plus.

While I appreciated these features, I didn’t actually allow Real Plans to do everything for me each week (I have a hard time letting go). We have fairly set routines in our house, often eating the same types of meals every week. This works for us. Since we have a better idea of what we want to eat each week, we found we’d initially overestimated how many planned meals we wanted and ended up deleting many of the automatic entries.

I recommend doing the questionnaire with your whole family to get a good reading on what you’ll want each week. You can always add later using the Recipe Box feature, a nifty tool that searches according to your preferences.

Call In a Professional

Real Plans has grown exponentially since it first landed on my radar, and one of the best new features is its “talk-to-a-real-person-style” live help calls.

The Real Plans interface has so many features that getting to know the program was difficult. While it’s really nice to be able to tell the machine that I want leftovers every Wednesday and that Taco Tuesday is on repeat, I’m not sure I would have figured this out without a help call. This would annoy me more if it wasn’t simple to call in help. I definitely recommend spending a few minutes talking to Real Plans’ helpful staff after buying a subscription (you’ll be prompted to do so)—it’ll make your investment worthwhile.

I scheduled one of these during my first week with the service and picked up all sorts of helpful tips and insider secrets.

My help desk attendee shared, for instance, that she uses Real Plans as a food diary to track her migraine symptoms. She adds a note if she wakes up in the morning with a headache, and since foods are already listed, she can quickly track her symptoms. Genius!

Make It Work For You

We loved that Real Plans is flexible enough to work around your needs. While it certainly has the ability to plan an entire Whole 30 worth of meals or generate enough AIP recipes to put your elimination phase on autopilot, it can also import recipes and has space for individualized notes.

This was important for us because we’re control freaks.

Our weekly schedule during this month was gluten free but included dairy. I wasn’t eating nightshades, but my boyfriend was mainlining them a couple times a week. We also like to take on one big cooking project a week, like making Philly Cheese Steaks from scratch.

The Real Plans recipe database is pretty vast. For $1 each per month, you can add recipes from bloggers like Autoimmune Wellness, Nom Nom Paleo, Wellness Mama, PaleOMG and our own dear Paleo Mom. The Whole 30 features are even more robust, allowing for different start dates and advanced preferences that I imagine would make the toughest parts of the program much easier.

But sometimes your boyfriend just wants to import a Jambalaya recipe from NYT Cooking. Real Plans has you covered there too. Imported recipes—whether they’re your own or ones dug out of the depths of the web—import fairly easily and even sync up with the shopping list. These recipes are saved after you import them, allowing you to build your own little virtual recipe box of favorites within Real Plans.

The added notes feature is handy too. I used this to add in notes where adding a recipe would mess up my ingredient list, like “leftover muffins” for breakfast or “big salad” for lunch.

Take It Along For The Ride

The mobile app is a big selling point for Real Plans, and I can totally see why. It has all the functionality of the online program. In fact, if you wanted to, you could run the whole thing from your phone or tablet.

Our favorite part of the app was the weekly shopping list. It automatically populates as you add meals or individual ingredients to your plan. I know, I know, it’s not that hard to write down your own list. But I’m all about saving a few minutes, especially when I’ve gone to the effort of meal planning already. Plus, the features are just handy.

For instance, I love that when I’m shopping, I can click on an individual ingredient and see what recipe I’m using it for, which helps me make more informed substitutions.

All in all, the list makes shopping for a family incredibly easy, and I imagine it only gets more helpful with a bigger list.

Of course, if you’re more about the physical paper, you can easily print your meal plan, shopping list, and timeline each week. I’ll admit I printed the plan and put it on our fridge for easy access.

My only qualm with this feature was that Real Plans only allows for one favorite store and an “online” option. I would love to be able to make different lists for Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods and the Farmer’s market, for instance.

All Things Considered

Real Plans helped us plan more effectively—from leftovers to big cooking “projects,” we kept our ingredients in one place and had fewer “I forgot the lemons” moments than before. We also saved money by reducing waste and avoiding expensive ingredients.

The Real Plans interface and app were simple to use, and I loved the addition of recipes from Autoimmune Wellness, Real Plans, and Nom Nom Paleo, which help flesh out the options in my Recipe Box. I was also able to make sure I met nutritional goals like eating more fish and veggies.

I’d recommend Real Plans to any busy family who wants to focus on health while maintaining their sanity (and budget).


Note: this post is part of a series of reviews written by my Digital Content Manager, Claire. Products were provided for review free of charge, but opinions are Claire’s. I may receive affiliate commission from one or more of the links in this post.

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TPV Podcast, Episode 256: Live Show Part 2 https://www.thepaleomom.com/tpv-podcast-live-show-part-2/ https://www.thepaleomom.com/tpv-podcast-live-show-part-2/#comments Fri, 14 Jul 2017 21:58:55 +0000 https://www.thepaleomom.com/?p=114661 In this episode, we bring you the second edition of our live show! We take live questions and answer them thoroughly! Click here to listen in iTunes or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes! The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 256: Live Show Part 2 Intro …
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In this episode, we bring you the second edition of our live show! We take live questions and answer them thoroughly!

Click here to listen in iTunes

or download and listen by clicking the PodBean Player below

If you enjoy the show, please review it in iTunes!

The Paleo View (TPV), Episode 256: Live Show Part 2

  • Intro (0:00)
  • Welcome to the live show, this is Part 2 of our show! Listen to Part 1 of the live show here!
  • Question 1: (:40) Lee’s Question: should she do an elimination diet, take a food allergy/sensitivity test with her doctor, or make other lifestyle changes to deal with autoimmunity? What’s the easiest way to identify her triggers?
    • Sarah: two issues here, dealing with a lifestyle triggers AND making positive changes to lifestyle.
      • Lee needs to figure out if she has SIBO, through further testing, and her doctor should be able to help her figure out this aspect of her intolerances. She should also retest.
      • She could also just be dealing with fructose malabsorption, which requires a different course of treatment.
      • Gut health is important either way—work up to 8 servings of veggies per day, eat more fish, don’t over-exercise, sleep enough.
      • Emotionally speaking: you can shorten your elimination phase to get into reintroductions more quickly
      • Keep a food journal for reintroductions, and try to keep a couple days between your reintroductions. Know also that if you’re stressed physically or mentally, your immune response will be affected.
    • Stacy: there are other outside factors like cleaning products, beauty products, other lifestyle factors in the home.
      • Stacy’s approach is build up healthy choices and nourish the body so that your health should get better over time. It’s a trajectory, not a matter of waking up one morning to completely new picture of health.
      • Remember that flares are to be expected, sometimes even caused by detoxing.
      • Consistency is really important – approach it from a place of doing it for yourself, for your health.
    • Lee has been trying to focus on the positives of her new healing life rather than the negatives of “losing” old foods
      • Stacy takes that approach too. Her family cooks better food, she’s healthier and her life is better.
    • Sarah: instead of doing EVERYTHING at once, breaking up your changes into pieces can be helpful.
    • Stacy: the food shouldn’t be stressful
      • Sometimes Stacy and Sarah are eating pizza and ice cream in their crazy dreams. And that’s usually a sign for Stacy that she’s thinking about food too much.
    • Lee says she’s struggled with reactions from people in her life.
      • Sarah says it’s not hard, it just has a learning curve.
      • Everybody has comfort recipes, but finding new go-to’s that fit a healthier lifestyle just takes a little time
  • Melissa’s Q: (28:00) How should someone without a gallbladder approach beginning a Paleo journey?
    • Stacy:
      • She doesn’t have a gallbladder. Understand you are missing part of your digestive tract.
      • Eliminating wheat and processed oils made the biggest difference. There’s a strong correlation between wheat intolerances/Celiac disease and gallbladder inflammation.
      • You want to watch the state of your bowel movements to track how your body is digesting.
      • Stacy does not do well with coconut oil, but does well with avocado oil and solid fats like tallow, lard, butter, duck fat.
      • Stacy also has a post on this, How to Enjoy Bacon Without a Gallbladder.
      • Insoluble fiber can be difficult for Stacy’s body as well.
        • Cabbage used to be tough for Stacy to digest.
        • She’s learned to cook foods that are high in insoluble fiber very thoroughly.
      • When you start your first meal of the day, start slow, reintroduce food to your body.
        • Intermittent fasting does not work because you don’t have bile storage.
    • Sarah
      • You can take ox bile, in a pill, at the beginning of a meal (work with a practitioner on this).
      • As lipases break apart fat, bile salts help to create a structure around fat molecules that brings them into the body.
      • So, it’s helpful in digesting and absorbing fat but ALSO in digesting and absorbing vitamins. It can help with nutrient sufficiency.
    • Stacy
      • Her mom doesn’t have a gallbladder, and when she was still eating vegetarian, she was low fat (and high soy/wheat) and still struggling.
      • Stacy doesn’t think it’s a low-fat diet that actually helps.
  • Melissa’s second question: On Lichen Planus?
    • Sarah
      • It’s most commonly a secondary disease (Hashimoto’s and Celiac are more likely to be primary).
      • It’s worthwhile to do some digging to find out if you have another autoimmune disease. If you haven’t given up gluten you can still test for Celiac.
      • Zinc, Vitamin D, Vitamin C deficiencies are worth testing for as well.
      • Supplement or look for food solutions if you’re deficient (sometimes Vitamin C supplements are corn-based, which might be an issue if you do have Celiac disease).
        • Sarah takes a Douglas Labs powdered version.
      • Wheat, soy, peanuts, tomatoes are immune triggers and lichen planus is an autoimmune condition. Figuring out triggers is key.
        • The AIP will guide you through this, as well as focus on nutrient-dense foods.
        • Fixing nutrient difficiencies can be very therapeutic for immune regulation.
        • It doesn’t mean there isn’t other tinkering outside of the AIP to be done, or that conventional medicine isn’t helpful, but after a couple months it’s an amazingly helpful intervention.
  • Rate and Review us! Goodbye!
  • Outro (53:08)

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